Psalms Part 1 – The Songs of Israel

9.1 What are the Psalms?
9.2 Authorship and Date of Composition
9.3 History of Interpretation
9.3.1 H. Gunkel (1862-1932)
9.3.2 S. Mowinckel (1884-1965)
9.3.3 FOR US TODAY:
In Jewish and Christian worship, Psalms have been loosed from any original cultic context they may have had. So there is no real point in digging that back up again. (See Brevard Childs Introduction to the Old Testament as Scripture pp 504-525 esp. 514)
9.4 Types of Psalms
9.5 Songs: Psalms of Praise 8, 18, 19, 34, 89, 95, 98, 100, 105, 111, 130, 145, 147, 148, 150
Praise psalms can be either individual or corporate. Over a third of the psalms in the book are praise psalms. Corporate psalms typically begin with an imperative call to praise (e.g., “shout to the LORD”) and describe all the good things the Lord has done. Individual praise often begins with a proclamation of intent to praise (e.g., “I will praise you, O LORD”) and declare what God has done in a particular situation in the psalmist’s life. The God of Israel is to be praised for His work in nature (Psalm 19:1; 89:5; 148:3), His deliverance of His people (Psalm 18:10; 111:9), and His wonderful attributes, such as lovingkindness and patience (Psalm 89:13–14; 130:7).
9.6 Songs: Psalms of Thanksgiving 30, 103, 104, 107, 117, 118, 136, 138, 139,
9.7 Songs: Declaring confidence in God 23, 27, 28, 37, 42, 46, 56, 145
9.8 Songs: Liturgical Psalms
Psalms playing a part in the religious life / the cult of Israel. The reconstructed New Year enthronement festival c.f. ANE analogies, Enuma elish 47,93, 95-100
9.9 Royal Psalms and Messianic Psalms 2, 18, 20, 21, 45, 72, 89, 101, 110, 118, 132.
Blessings on the current king AND future eschatological hope – the reigning king now and the future great king will bring righteousness, victory, prosperity, justice, especially for the poor and oppressed. Including the Messianic Psalms especially 2:6-7, 22 and 110

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